INTERVIEW WITH INTEL VICE PRESIDENT

INTEL ALL SET TO ESTABLISH A SOFTWARE COLLEGE IN PAKISTAN

PUNJAB GOVERNMENT ADMIRED FOR STARTING INITIATIVES LIKE GIVING FREE LAPTOPS TO STUDENTS

"LEADERSHIP THINKING PROGRAMMES" MAKING PAKISTAN ONE OF THE ROLE MODELS FOR OTHER DEVELOPING OR UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRIES

KANWAL SALEEM
(feedback@pgeconomist.com)

Sep 17 - 23, 20
12

LAHORE: Mr. John E. Davies is an Intel Vice President and General Manager of the Intel World Ahead Program. The Intel World Ahead Program promotes increased access to technology in emerging markets, enabling millions to be part of the computing/connected world for the first time and has helped improve education and healthcare, stimulate economies, and enrich lives around the world.

During his 34 years with Intel, Mr. John E. Davies has worked in various senior engineering, marketing and management positions. He has been Director of Marketing for the Mobile Computing Group and the Consumer Desktop Products Group. In late 90s, Davies was General Manager of Intel Asia Pacific region, based in Hong Kong. Intel has awarded Davies two prestigious Individual Achievement Awards for establishing Intel in the European automotive market in 1986, and for driving Intel's mobile computing architecture into the Japanese market in 1992. More recently, he won Latin Trade's Bravo award for 2010 Technology Leader of the Year.

During his recent visit to Lahore Mr. John E. Davies told Pakistan and Gulf Economist (PAGE) that Intel works with governments, organizations, and industries around the world to advocate policies that encourage new ideas, promote fair commerce, and protect resources. By promoting innovation and competition worldwide, Intel seeks to help people and businesses thrive in an increasingly global economy, he said. He added that Intel today designs and manufactures a variety of essential technologies, including microprocessors and chipsets and the additional hardware, software, and related services that together serve as the foundation for many of the world's computing devices.

According to him, "Intel today has more than 100,000 employees in 63 countries and serves customers in more than 120 countries. Intel today designs and manufactures a variety of essential technologies, including microprocessors and chipsets and the additional hardware, software, and related services that together serve as the foundation for many of the world's computing devices."

Over the last decade, he said, Intel has evolved from a company that largely serves the PC industry, to a company that increasingly provides the vital intelligence inside all things computing. In fact, one-third of Intel's revenue is associated with products beyond the PC. He said, "Hardware and software products by Intel and subsidiaries such as McAfee, power the majority of the world's data centers, connect hundreds of millions of cellular handsets and help secure and protect computers, mobile devices and corporate and government IT systems. Intel technologies are also inside intelligent systems, such as in automobiles, automated factories and medical devices."

Mr. John E. Davies said Intel technologies are used in a range of devices and applications, from PCs, notebooks, and Ultra book devices to tablets and smart phones and the data centers that support them. Intel technologies are also inside intelligent systems, such as in automobiles, automated factories and medical devices. Intel also develops and sells software and services focused primarily on security and technology integration. Through these products and services, Intel aims to deliver engaging, consistent and secure experiences across all Internet-connected devices, whether in the home, car, office, or pocket, he added.

He said around three million people worldwide use computers while 6 billion are required to get the same. He praised the initiatives taken by the government for expanding computer outreach. He admired the Punjab government for starting initiatives like giving free laptops to students apart from starting computer labs in schools. He said most of the programmes are "leadership thinking programme" making Pakistan one of the role models for other developing or underdeveloped countries.

Answering a question, he said Intel is going to establish a Software College in Pakistan in order to prepare a strong team of professions for the promotion of software industry.

Talking about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Mr. John E. Davies said, "At Intel, we don't separate corporate responsibility from our business; it's an integral part of our management approach and our overall global strategy." The Intel brand makes it a priority to give back each year to ensure responsibility to communities and the future of innovation. For the past some years, Intel has remained amongst the top ten most valuable brands in the world. The Intel is the single-largest voluntary purchaser of green power in the United States, and proudly invest over $100 million each year in education across more than 50 countries, he added.

Mr. John E. Davies further said the Intel is investing to develop the future of computing. In the last decade Intel spent more than $50 billion in research and development. In 2011, Intel's worldwide R&D investment was $8.4 billion.

To another question, Mr. John E. Davies said, "Intel seeks to drive public policies that speed the adoption of healthcare technologies to improve results for individuals and expand healthcare technology markets worldwide. Intel supports policies that provide incentives to expand alternatives and other institutional care. Intel is desirous to work with authorities globally to ensure that the benefits of telemedicine reach the most needy."

Mr. John E. Davies said, "We are desirous to work hand in hand with the government, entrepreneurs, NGOs and others for the promotion of education, healthcare and businesses for the ultimate benefits of people by using latest technology."