Home / This Week / Cover Stories / Cryptocurrencies plunge broadly as bitcoin facing biggest weekly fall

Cryptocurrencies plunge broadly as bitcoin facing biggest weekly fall

Cryptocurrencies plunged on Friday, with bitcoin at one point sliding below $8,000 and headed for its biggest weekly loss since December 2013, amid worries about a regulatory clampdown globally. The currencies have come off their lows but analysts said the sell-off was probably not over.

This week’s slump brought the total market value of cryptocurrencies down to around $400 billion, half the high it reached in January, according to industry tracker Coinmarketcap.com. The market value of cryptocurrencies is calculated by multiplying the number of digital coins in existence by their price, although many question whether that is the right way to value them.

Bitcoin, the biggest and best-known cryptocurrency, fell as much as 15 percent on Friday to a two-month low of $7,625 on the Luxembourg-based Bitstamp exchange BTC=BSP. It clawed back some losses and was down around 5.6 percent at $8,498 in late New York trading.

The virtual currency is down by close to 25 percent this week and almost 40 percent in 2018. It surged more than 1,000 percent though in 2017.

For some market participants, bitcoin may be down, but it is not likely to fade.

“Bitcoin has become, and will continue to be, primarily a speculative asset class,” said David Moskowitz, Co-founder and Director of Indorse, the decentralized social network for professionals. He added that the recent drops in transaction fees have made it easier to use bitcoin for payments once again. And if a payment solution can help the congestion, bitcoin may once again become an effective payment network, Moskowitz said.

The second and third largest virtual currencies, Ethereum and Ripple, also plunged more than 20 percent at the session low, Coinmarketcap.com said. Ethereum was last down 13.2 percent, at $888.22, while Ripple last traded at 83 U.S. cents, down 14.7 percent.

Retail investors have poured money into digital coins, enticed by the huge run-up in prices. Regulators say cryptocurrencies are highly speculative and dangerous investments.

On Thursday, India vowed to eradicate the use of crypto-assets, joining China and South Korea in promising to ban parts of the nascent market where prices have boomed in recent years.

Social media website Facebook said this week it would ban cryptocurrency advertisements because many were associated with misleading or deceptive promotional practices. U.S. regulators have sent a subpoena to two of the world’s biggest cryptocurrency players, Bitfinex and Tether.

 

A massive $530 million hack of a Japanese cryptocurrency exchange last week renewed worries about the security of the industry.

Critics of virtual currencies have called the run-up in prices a speculative bubble, but supporters of cryptocurrencies say short-term price volatility is to be expected, and the blockchain technology underpinning these assets maintains its power and value.

Going back to 2011 and including the current selloff, bitcoin’s price has been halved nine times on the Bitstamp exchange before recovering. The last time was from November 2014 to January 2015.

Bank of America and jpmorgan chase ban credit crypto purchases

Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase will reportedly no longer enable customers to purchase bitcoin with credit cards starting in February, reports say.

Revealed in a Bloomberg report, last week, JPMorgan is expected to start its ban on Feb. 3 due to concerns about the credit risk of those who make purchases through their cards. Bank of America is said to be launching its ban on Feb. 2, when transactions with known cryptocurrency exchanges will begin to be declined.

The Bank of America ban is limited to credit cards, and will not impact customers who wish to purchase cryptocurrencies using debit or ATM cards, according to the news source.

Bloomberg further reported that the Bank of America cited anti-money laundering regulations for the move, as well as the potential for thieves to convert stolen credit cards into cryptocurrency stashes.

Like JPMorgan, Bank of America is also concerned with the idea customers can purchase more cryptocurrency than they can afford. Other banks have purportedly moved to increase charges for crypto transactions in recent weeks.

Stepping back, move coincides with a broader discussion among financial firms about how their businesses are being impacted by the cryptocurrency economy, which after growing by leaps and bounds in 2017, has seen a sizable market drawdown so far this year.– Agencies

Check Also

Need to focus on key areas to supersede in global Halal products

Need to focus on key areas to supersede in global Halal products

Having huge potential in livestock, dairy and poultry sectors, Pakistan has so far failed to …

Leave a Reply